Chief Justice Roberts: An Evangelist for the New Federal Rules Amendments

We’ve been beating the drum for years now about the newly effective amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, touting the potential they hold to make civil litigation more efficient and more cost-effective. Now we’re joined by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who champions the new rules amendments in his 2015 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary.

Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure – They’re Here!

After a five-year long rule-making process, significant proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure take effect today. The slate of amendments approved by the Supreme Court earlier this year will govern all proceedings in civil cases commenced after December 1, 2015, and “insofar as just and practicable,” all proceedings already pending.

Dear Mr. Speaker and Mr. President—The Supreme Court Submits to Congress the Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

In several prior posts here on the DiscoverReady blog, we presented analysis and updates regarding the slate of proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Yesterday those amendments came one step closer to implementation, when the Supreme Court issued an order adopting them and transmitting them to Congress.

Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: A Quick Update

As covered here in the DiscoverReady blog, a number of proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are in the works. As I mentioned in my last post on the amendments, the Civil Rules Advisory Committee unanimously approved the latest round of revisions and passed them on for consideration to the Judicial Conference's Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure (the “Standing Committee”).


Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: The Latest Update

Over the last couple years, a number of proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure have been working their way through the rulemaking process. In two prior posts here, we explained these potential revisions, which were drafted by subcommittees of the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules, including the Duke Conference Subcommittee and the Discovery Subcommittee.