Magistrate Judge Peck Encourages Litigants – But Won’t Force Them – to Use TAR

In this employment discrimination case against the City of New York, the parties asked the court to resolve a number of discovery disputes, including a disagreement about the methodology that should be used to find responsive documents. The City preferred to use keyword searches, and the parties had engaged in some preliminary discussions about the appropriate keywords. Read about Judge Peck's order on technology assisted review.

“Predictive Coding Must Be the Way Forward” – So Says the UK High Court of Justice

Back in March we reported on Pyrrho Investments Ltd. v. MWB Property Ltd., the first order by a British court approving the use of the use of technology assisted review (TAR) for litigation disclosures. In that case, Master Matthews drew heavily from Magistrate Judge Peck’s landmark decision in Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, and crafted a list of ten factors weighing in favor of the use of TAR. The court found no factors suggesting TAR should not be used. Now, another UK court has approved the use of TAR, but this time in a different posture.

Technology Assisted Review (TAR) Across the Atlantic: UK Court Approves the Use of TAR for Electronic Disclosures

A British court has now joined courts in the United States—and one in Ireland—by approving the use of technology assisted review (TAR) in litigation. On February 16, 2016, in the matter Pyrrho Investments Ltd. v. MWB Property Ltd., Master Matthews of the High Court of Justice Chancery Division granted the parties’ request to use predictive coding technology to identify documents for electronic disclosures (the U.K. analog to U.S. e-discovery). According to Master Matthews, it was the first such decision in the U.K.

DiscoverReady’s New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year! As we turn the calendar to 2016 and reflect on what the year ahead might bring, I asked some of my DiscoverReady colleagues to share some of their resolutions for the new year. Here’s what they resolve to accomplish in 2016. . .

Litigating in California? Be Sure You’re Ethically Competent in e-Discovery

Last year the State Bar of California Standing Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct issued two draft opinions answering the question “What are an attorney’s ethical duties in the handling of discovery of electronically stored information?” After receiving public comment on the drafts, the Committee recently issued its final version, Formal Opinion No. 2015-193. Even a highly experienced attorney may need some assistance in certain litigation matters involving ESI.