Ripped from the Headlines: Automobile Cybersecurity and the Internet of Things

n Sunday night’s episode of the CBS television show CSI: Cyber, a hacker “cyber-jacks” automobiles—some empty, some with drivers behind the wheel—and uses them as remote-controlled cars to cause deadly crashes. As I watched the show, I couldn’t help but think back to my blog post earlier this year about the security vulnerability of our cars (and other devices we use every day) that are connected to the Internet of Things. Is the premise of the television show pure fiction? Exaggeration of a minor threat for dramatic effect?

The Internet of Things — Let the Litigation Commence

Legal commentators have been speculating about how the “Internet of Things” could generate a flood of new litigation. Some of that speculation recently became reality, when plaintiffs filed a class action against a group of automakers, alleging that they sold unsafe cars because their internet connectivity creates vulnerability to hackers.

Data Security and Data Breaches – A Summer Reading List

Ah, summertime . . . Colleagues and friends are heading to the beach, gathering up their summer reading collection. But right now I’m not focused on page-turning thrillers or rom-com novels. Instead, I’m thinking about data security and privacy. I’m exploring the factors that heighten the risk of a data breach, the staggering impact a breach can have on an organization, and how companies can minimize their risk of a breach.

May the Luck of the Irish be With You (and Your TAR).

Just in time for a St. Patrick’s Day eDiscovery blog post, earlier this month the High Court in Dublin issued an order approving the use of technology assisted review (TAR). In Irish Bank Resolution Corporation Ltd. v. Sean Quinn, Justice Fullam found that “technology assisted review using predictive coding discharges a party’s discovery obligations” under the applicable Supreme Court rule, Rule O.31 r.12.

Welcome to the New Year – Artificial Intelligence and Legal Discovery in 2015

As you may have noticed, over the last several weeks in the e-discovery blogosphere there’s been no shortage of posts looking back at developments in 2014 and making predictions about what’s ahead in 2015. So I resisted the temptation to make my own list. Instead, I decided to spend some time doing a deeper dive ...