Data Privacy & Information Governance Get Intimate

Data privacy and information governance get intimate in a recently-settled claim against the Canadian company We-Vibe. The lawsuit alleged that they violated customers' privacy by tracking the very intimate details surrounding usage of "adult sensual lifestyle products," which illustrates again the complexity and ramifications of data collecting, aggregation, and analytics in today's world. And what's particularly interesting is something we've discussed before on this blog, data context.

EU-US Privacy Shield: Good News & Bad News

We’ve got some good news and some bad news regarding the EU-US Privacy Shield, the trans-Atlantic data transfer framework approved by regulators in July of 2016. The U.S. Department of Commerce recently approved DiscoverReady’s Privacy Shield self-certification submission, which means that our clients may lawfully transfer personal data from the EU to us.

Some Things Don’t Need to be Discovered. Protect Sensitive Data in Discovery.

Today’s corporate information systems are awash with highly sensitive data. Whether it’s personally identifiable information (“PII”), personal health information (“PHI”), financial and payment information, intellectual property and trade secrets, source code—the list goes on—sensitive information exists in virtually every collection of data. Learn to protect this sensitive data from discovery.

A New Framework for Trans-Atlantic Data Transfers: The EU-U.S. Privacy Shield

On February 2, 2016, the European Commission and the U.S. Department of Commerce announced a new framework to govern the transfer of data from the EU to the United States, referred to as the EU-U.S. “Privacy Shield." The new protocol is intended to replace the 15-year-old Safe Harbor agreement that the European Court of Justice struck down in October, on the grounds that it failed to adequately protect the privacy rights of EU citizens.

Coming in 2016: Tougher New Data Privacy Rules in the European Union

European Commission and European Parliament officials last week agreed on a new set of data protection laws, intended to strengthen individuals’ privacy rights and create a more consistent set of regulations across the twenty-eight European Union member countries. Learn highlights of the new rules including provisions addressing many main points aspects of the European Union privacy rules.