Home » Posts Tagged "Electronically Stored Information (ESI)"

InfoSec Guidance for In-House & Outside Counsel

Previously, we’ve explored the ever-increasing information security risks faced by law firms, which hold some of their clients’ most sensitive and confidential information. This week, one of the world’s largest and most respected law firms fell victim to a ransomware attack, shutting down its entire computer network system for several days. The Model Controls address thirteen areas of security measures which are designed to serve as a list of baseline security measures that corporate counsel may consider requiring its outside law firms to implement.

Blind to Sensitive Corporate Data?

The common practice of sensitive data "de-structuring" creates significant enterprise information risk. When sensitive information becomes de-structured — leaving secure systems of record and moving to more vulnerable unstructured data sources — the corporate enterprise faces increased risk. Learn how that risk can be managed through data analytics and good information governance practices.

Judge Peck’s Latest “Wake-Up Call”

In his recent opinion in Fischer v. Forrest, 14 Civ. 1304 (PAE) (AJP), 2017 WL 773694 (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 28, 2017), Judge Peck declares that “It is time, once again, to issue a discovery wake-up call to the Bar in this District: the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended effective December 1, 2015, and one change that affects the daily work of every litigator is Rule 34.” Can you name the three requirements the Judge lays out for responses and objections under amended Rule 34?

Stipulations for Discovery of ESI: America’s Next Top Model

In federal court—and in most state courts—parties must meet and confer at the beginning of the litigation to discuss various case management issues, and hopefully reach stipulated agreements about those issues. The discussions must address the discovery of electronically stored information, a subject that in too many cases causes needless amounts of disagreement, delay, expense, and overall angst among the litigants and counsel. Why is the negotiation of ESI stipulations so difficult?

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